Prison Project: Canine Facilitated Animal Assisted Intervention
Department of Sociology, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan; Drumheller Institution; Prairie Regional Psychiatric Centre; Stony Mountain Institution; Faculty of Social Work University of Regina; St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog Program (Saskatchewan) (Manitoba); PAWSitive Support

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Funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (INMHA) & Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse

The purpose of the project is to undertake an evaluation of the St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog (SK & MB) and PAWSitive Support Canine Assisted Learning (AB) programs being offered at federal institutions in the Prairie provinces of Canada. The program offerings range from an animal assisted activity (AAA) [no therapist involved in the visit] to an animal assisted therapy (AAT) [therapist involved in the visit]. A virtual follow-up visiting  component was recently added. The research question is: Does the program help participants connect with a Therapy Dog through the attainment of perceived love and support? There are several outcome measures identified (e.g., induce calmness, sociability). Read more here.

 

Animal Memories
Department of Sociology, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan; Drumheller Institution; Prairie Regional Psychiatric Centre; Stony Mountain Institution; Matsqui Prison; Nova Institution; Faculty of Social Work University of Regina; St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog Program (Saskatchewan) (Manitoba); PAWSitive Support Canine Assisted Learning Program (Alberta), Correctional Service Canada Citizens Advisory Committee, Correctional Service Canada Community Engagement.

Funded by CSC /CAC Kickstarter Initiative

This national project is supported by Citizen Engagement’s ‘CAC Kickstarter’ initiative. It raises awareness about the many benefits of human-animal connections by:
1. Profiling research findings and the multiple CSC animal-assisted interventions currently offered, and
2. Inviting inmates to submit PAWSitive memories — stories, art work, photos, and/or poetry.
All findings will be shared in an on-line magazine in 2019.