Combating Student Stress in the Engineering Classroom
Department of Civil, Geological and Environmental Engineering, Department of Sociology, Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning, University of Saskatchewan


Funded by the Office of the Research Chair in Substance Abuse, University of Saskatchewan

The aim of this study is to measure the impact of a therapy dog on student stress in a first year, university level engineering design class. It is well established that first year engineering students have a high level of stress and associated anxiety. It is also established that both can negatively impact student learning. This study will compare students in a classroom with and without a therapy dog on their experience of stress within the classroom. It will also examine whether the goals of the St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog program are being met and how they are experienced by students: comfort and support.

PAWS Your Stress: University of Saskatchewan Campus Program
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse; Department of Sociology, School of Public Health, Student Health Services, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, What’s Your Cap?, University of Saskatchewan; Department of Sociology, McMaster University; St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog Program (Saskatchewan); University of Regina; Carleton University

u-of-s
Funded by the Office of the Research Chair in Substance Abuse, University of Saskatchewan, funded by a grant from the Saskatchewan Ministry of Health

Student mental health is a concern on university campuses, and animal-assisted interventions are one response. This study examined the immediate and three-month follow-up outcomes of a pilot evaluation study of the St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog program at three Canadian universities. It was found that the therapy dogs offer love and support. Love is understood as having reciprocal love for the dogs and gaining positive feelings from visiting with them. Support is understood as de-stressing and relaxing by interacting with the dogs. Implications for mental health supports for university students are suggested. Read about the findings here.

Animal-assisted Intervention, Physical Activity and Musculoskeletal Health in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Dog PAAL Study) (C. Dell Co-Investigator)
Autism Services Saskatoon; College of Kinesiology, College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, Department of Sociology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Public Health, Veterinary Biomedical Sciences University of Saskatchewan; St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog Program (Saskatchewan); University of Regina

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Funded by the University of Saskatchewan One Health Research Development Grant Program

Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have a high incidence of bone fracture in childhood and later life. This study investigates: (1) the effect of a therapy dog on physical activity in children with ASD and (2) compares imaged musculoskeletal health outcomes, habitual physical activity and dietary intake between children with ASD and their controls.

We Let the Dogs In! Lessons Learned from Having a Therapy Dog in the University Classroom
Department of Sociology, Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching Effectiveness, University of Saskatchewan


Funded by the Office of the Research Chair in One Health & Wellness

This exploratory project examines the impact of a St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog on student learning within a university classroom setting.